Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Lee

David Lee

Founder, humanNature@Work

David Lee, the founder of HumanNature@Work (www.HumanNatureAtWork.com), helps employers in service industries improve employee engagement, customer service, and morale, though his work as a consultant, trainer, and executive coach. He has worked with organizations and presented at conferences both domestically and abroad for over 20 years. An internationally recognized thought leader in the field of employee engagement and performance, Mr. Lee is the author of over 60 articles and book chapters on employer branding, onboarding, and other topics related to employee performance that have been published in trade journals and books in the US, Europe, India, Australia, and China. His articles (downloadable at HumanNatureAtWork.com ) have included: • “How to Recession Proof Your Workforce” • “What Reputation Are Your Employees Creating?” • “What Leaders Can Learn From Sales Superstars” • “Becoming a 'People Whisperer': How to Communicate So People Care About—and Act On—What You Say” • “The Movie Scene Every Manager Should See…But Might Be Afraid to Watch” The just published second edition of the business classic, The Talent Management Handbook, features a chapter of his on the topic of new employee orientation and onboarding. In addition to his research and work with both struggling and high performance organizations, Mr. Lee's work draws from a wide range of scientific disciplines including cognitive neuroscience, anthropology, psychoneuroimmunology, trauma and resilience research, and paleopsychology. Taking this research which typically doesn't find its way into the business world, Mr. Lee translates these principles of human nature into leadership and managerial practices that optimize employee performance. Using the popular TV show The Dog Whisperer as an analogy for the difference understanding human nature makes, Mr. Lee's work helps leaders and managers become “Employee Whisperers.” Mr. Lee's work in the area of optimizing the performance of Gen Y employees draws from industry research as well as his own interviews with top performing managers of Gen Y employees and Gen Y employees themselves. Mr. Lee doesn't just offer practical advice on how to bring out the best in this more challenging generation of workers. He also offers a unique perspective on how this generation of employees provides employers with a powerful opportunity to upgrade their management practices, and by doing so, thrive in today's more demanding economy. For more of David Lee's articles, go to HumanNatureAtWork.com/

Mr. Lee can be contacted at 207-571-9898 or david@humannatureatwork.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.