John Mavros

Regardless of the number of employment law best practices a hotel successfully embraces, one factor can be a strong indicator for future litigation – a problematic, underperforming employee. Therefore, one the best ways to protect your hotel from litigation is to hire right at the outset. In the chaos of peak season, it may be tempting to impulsively hire the first application for help received; however, hiring is a process that should not be rushed. An employee who fails to meet performance expectations or mesh with the hotel's company culture, not only can create a toxic environment at work for other employees but will likely harbor resentment which frequently motivates litigation. Read on...

Kurt Meister

Today, some of the foremost hotel security threats are crimes on which insurers have started to tighten the reigns. These include abuse (both sexual and physical), battery and molestation. Adding to the mix is the despicable global crime of human trafficking. Each of these emerging threats brings new questions for hotels and their employees, including how employees can identify this type of deviant activity. This article walks you through each of these emerging threats and explores the risks, the potential solutions, the value of getting it right, and the ever-expanding costs of allowing this type of activity at your hotel. Read on...

Library Archives

 
Michael Jacobson

Illinois hotels and their restaurant, banquet and spa outlets are – more than ever – dedicating resources to establish eco-friendly practices that aim to preserve our environment. There is an abundance of ways hotels are being mindful in their everyday business practices, including initiatives ranging from monitoring for energy and water efficiency to reducing plastics, crafting sustainable wine lists and even placing used furniture with those in need. As one of the Illinois Hotel & Lodging Association's core platforms, we explore how hotels nationwide can implement thoughtful, sustainable and turnkey practices as exemplified by others leading the way in this critical effort. Read on...

David Ashen

Remember when rooftop bars and cool restaurants were novel? What was once unique enough to rile up crowds and delight hotel guests has now become the norm. Fortunately, hoteliers are now looking for fresh ways to connect with – and inspire – the communities that surround them. David Ashen, president & CEO of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, examines what's behind this shift and some top ways today's brands are answering the call for connection, from art installations that excite to socially-conscious initiatives and more, hotels are more than a mere place for heads in beds. Read on...

Amanda Hurley

As people continue to take more interest in their pet's well-being, pet travel has become increasingly popular. In fact, according to the 2017-2018 APPA National Pet Owners Survey, 37% of pet owners travel with their pets every year, which is a nearly 20% increase from a decade ago. Savvy hoteliers know how to capitalize on this and stay relevant among the competition. In fact, more than half of US hotels now allow pets, according to the 2018 American Hotel & Lodging Association Hotel Trends Survey. This case study explores the ways in which the Inn at East Beach, managed by broughtonHOTELS, used operational and promotional strategies to ensure the hotel was set up for success in becoming a dog-friendly hotel. Read on...

Bob Neal

Rooted in history, our nation's capital is full of character and charm, and a focus on preservation is the norm rather than the exception. That's why the design for Columbia Place, a recently completed, mixed-use development combining a dual-branded hotel, residences and retail with historic buildings in Washington, D.C.'s Shaw District, didn't need to invent a new sense of place. Design and architectural firm COOPER CARRY in collaboration with tvsdesign instead built upon its origins. Striking an artful balance between "then" and "now", Columbia Place blends centuries-old structures with modern living to honor history while also welcoming the next generation. Read on...

S. Lakshmi Narasimhan

So, what does the future hold in store for guest loyalty? And more importantly loyalty for independent hotels? Well, independent hotels have their work cut out for them but do not need to despair. The customer is looking for value offerings and in recent times does not care whether they are from independent or chain hotels. A slickly executed marketing strategy on the foundation of strong differentiation and tying into guest personalization demands can bring the bacon home. Owners of these independent hotels who have already stuck their necks out with the investment can then laugh all the way to the bank. Read on...

Mostafa Sayyadi

Hotel executives find that knowledge management is the in the forefront of success. And knowledge management could be the most important component of success in this ever-changing business environment of today. This, by far, is why some hotels are successful and some are not. The key take-away for hotel executives is that knowledge management is a resource that enables hotels to solve problems and create value through improved performance and it is this point that will narrow the gaps of success and failure leading to more successful decision-making. Read on...

William Toth

William Toth, Spa Director at the brand new St. Somewhere Spa at Margaritaville Resort Orlando discusses trends in the spa industry in 2019. As consumers become more educated on the capabilities of resort spas, products and treatments, industry leaders are looking to find differentiators. What are consumers looking for? Current trends can be broken down into four factors. They are facilities, experience, services, and results. Especially for those wishing to make their spas a part of their revenues or profit, since spas surely add to the profit of a hotel, all of these factors should be considered. For that reason, this article will focus on those factors as a guide towards a successful spa. Read on...

Michael Hess

Today, almost everything we use is driven by technology. This includes your hotel's waste management program: Enter the smart waste compactor. The goal of a compactor is to condense waste to optimize the space for everyday trash disposal. A smart waste compactor takes this the next level and delivers a real-time, cloud-based dashboard to give you the insights about your compactor you need to better understand your hotel's waste usage. We wanted to give you a rundown of the key benefits of a smart waste compactor on your hotel and how it can make your hotel's waste management program smarter. Read on...

Gerardo Solaro del Borgo

Over the past decades, we have seen how significant our impact on nature can be and the long-term consequences that imply. Leisure and business tourism move millions of people every year, and taking initiatives to protect nature should be a main priority for all hospitality companies around the globe. Taking care of the environment through a green-building approach, implementing new systems to preserve and recycle water resources and developing a biomass power plant to provide green energy are just a few activities that Toscana Resort Castelfalfi has undertaken to preserve the pristine nature that surrounds it and to ensure guests' wellbeing. Read on...

Andrew Nielsen

Inspired by the location's rich history, embracing today's prevailing trends, and with a steady eye toward the future, Current doesn't suffer the effects of time. Every element of Tampa's new Marriott Autograph Collection hotel on Rocky Point is steeped in intention, from the location, architecture, art gallery, and dining options, to the guest rooms – each one specifically designated to make sure it maintains an ocean view. The hotel stimulates all of the senses, and the excitement of something new is right around the corner. Offerings remain fresh with ever-changing menus at Julian and Rox, and a curated art gallery with rotating exhibits. In this way, Current travelers and visitors are always offered a unique taste of Tampa Bay. Read on...

Mostafa Sayyadi

This article points out the vital importance of hotel leadership in effectively aggregating human capital into social capital to achieve higher degrees of competitiveness. This article draws upon the role of hotel executives as social architects that provide elaborative insight for followers by illuminating how hotel executives can effectively build and spend social capital within hotels. This article suggests that it is critical that hotel executives understand that hotel leadership supports social capital to effectively implement knowledge management projects and therefore, remain competitive. Read on...

Marcela Trujillo

Increasing ADR, in conjunction with appropriate occupancy levels, is an ever-present goal. Not only does this increase RevPAR, but gaining more revenue through ADR provides assets with increased profitability. Consistent application of the following proven techniques leads to consistent rate dominance. In this article, co-authors Marcelo Trujillo and David Beaulieu rely on their experience of more than 35 combined years to thoroughly analyze and explain the pathway to sustainable ADR to maximize a hotel's success. Read on...

Bill Caswell

A recent Econsultancy survey querying companies on the most exciting opportunity for 2019 found that customer experience (CX) topped the list, edging out content marketing and mobile marketing. This CX trend has been accelerating over the last several years – especially in the hotel industry. As hotels pursued customer experience strategies, however, they often neglected to invest in their most important competitive advantage: the employees tasked with delivering the customer experience. In the hotel industry, you can't outcompete rivals on CX without an employee experience program that produces satisfied, well-trained employees. Read on...

Court Williams

The hospitality industry is enjoying a healthy period of innovation and growth, with many opportunities for differentiation among the various brands. Successfully "doing business differently" requires pioneering leadership, however, and it's not always easy to find CEOs with the right skills and attributes. With the changes brought about by technology, finding suitable business leaders for the future is paradoxically both easier and more challenging. Hotel company CEOs now need to have a completely different skill set than they did before. This article looks at six of the trends we're currently seeing in hospitality leadership and where hotel companies can source people with the leadership skills they need. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

By addressing channel performance-the concept of measuring key performance indicators across a complex, multi-channel booking landscape-hoteliers can optimize pricing and marketing across all channels, and boost revenue as a result. But for those new to the world of advanced revenue management practices and technology, how does one begin to map out a proactive and profitable distribution strategy? How you choose to distribute your offerings must be carefully and regularly assessed, with the goal of maximizing your profit potential always in mind. Evaluating channel acquisition costs, looking beyond online travel agencies (OTAs) for better revenue opportunities, and finding ways to drive more direct bookings are all good practices for monitoring and improving the health of your distribution strategy. Read on...

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Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as "Biophilic Design." Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.