Editorial Board   

Mr. Haynie, SR.

Michael Haynie, SR.

President, Parkway Hospitality Management

Michael Haynie has devoted his entire professional career to the lodging and hospitality industry. After attending Northeastern University in Boston, MA, he took on various entry level positions before rising through the ranks to the executive level positions he has held for many years. Mr. Haynie has experience in every facet of hotel operations and has served in leadership capacities in hotels ranging from economy to luxury. Prior to launching his own hotel management enterprise, Mr. Haynie served as the Vice-President and Managing Director of Baltimore's Tremonts Hotels which encompassed the upscale Tremont Plaza Hotel and the economy Tremont Park Hotel. He also spearheaded the debut of the award-winning Tremont Grand events venue. Under his leadership, Baltimore's Tremonts ascended to new levels of profitability due to the strategic initiatives Mr. Haynie implemented. Mr. Haynie has also served as a General Manager with Hilton and InterContinental Hotels in Baltimore, Boston, and Hartford; as well as a General Manager with independent and branded hotels in Charlotte, Hartford, Boston and Washington, DC. While developing his extensive professional port folio, Mr. Haynie has also held numerous community service leadership roles in the Baltimore area. He currently serves as the Co-Chairman of Baltimore's National Academy Foundation High School (NAF), a flagship public high school, which pairs a college preparatory curriculum with five career disciplines: hospitality and tourism, finance, information technology, law and engineering. In addition to being a dedicated and effective youth mentor and advocate, Mr. Haynie was instrumental in helping NAF move and expand to its own middle/high school campus. NAF will now provide career enrichment opportunities to twice as many students. Mr. Haynie recently concluded a term as Chairman of the Board for the Historic Charles Street Association and he currently serves on the board of directors for each of the following professional organizations: The Maryland Tourism Development Board; Visit Baltimore Board of Directors; Charles Street Development Corporation; the Downtown Management Authority, The Downtown Partnership Board of Directors; the Hospitality Advisory Board for the Morgan State University School of Hospitality and The Maryland Hotel and Lodging Association; President of the Waverly Main Street Organization. Mr. Haynie was honored by the Maryland Hotel & Lodging Industry in 2007 as the state's “Hotelier of the Year” and in 2009 as the “Office of Tourism Development as the “ Mentor of the Year”.

Mr. Haynie, SR. can be contacted at 443-604-3835 or mhaynie@parkwaymgt.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.