Editorial Board   

Mr. Hall

Stephen Hall

Founder, Brandworks Distribution LLC

Stephen S.J. Hall was a 1956 graduate of the school of Hotel Administration at Cornell University. He also holds an MBA with high honors from Michigan State University as well as a Masters Degree in Divinity from Harvard. After serving as a Marine Corps officer from 1956 to 1958 he spent most of his career in the hospitality industry starting as a field engineer with Sheraton Corporation. He was promoted to Director of Operations Support for ITT Sheraton leaving in 1971 to become Vice President for Administration of Harvard where he managed 10 departments with an annual budget of $95 million dollars spending an additional 300 million per annum for new construction. While at ITT Sheraton one of his duties was as the first Quality Assurance Director in the industry. In 1981 he formed a quality assurance consulting company and implemented the first quality assurance program in the American Hotel and Lodging Association. The company also put in programs in the Bahamas as well as several hotels in the US including the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, WV. Mr. Hall has taught Quality Assurance at several universities including Cornell, the University of Nevada Las Vegas, New Hampshire, the Instut de Management Hoteiier in Cergy- Pontoise, France as well as Glion in Switzerland where he was also the Director of Studies. He has given seminars worldwide. He has also held positions as Pastor of the Congregational church in Cohasset Massachusetts and the Associate Pastor of the American Church in Paris, France. Mr. Hall has written and published four books: QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY - The American Society for Quality Control, READINGS IN ETHICS - Education Institute of AH&LA, JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE - Dog Ear Press and PLUMB BOB - Dog Ear Press. While quality assurance is traditionally defined as conformance to standards will Mr. Hall has promoted the idea that conformance to standards alone is insufficient. Standards must be “right” standards thus introducing ethics and replaces quality assurance with the word excellence as the ultimate goal. Excellence is defined as “consistently doing right things.” Although several surveys, in recent years, indicated that managers have a strong interest in ethics and consider the practice of ethics to be beneficial to the bottom line, few hotels have a comprehensive program of ethics in place. The problem is analyzed in the book PLUMB BOB which also includes a new theory of which can be easily taught to employees

Mr. Hall can be contacted at Larry_Hall@SpringerMiller.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.