Editorial Board   

Mr. Hall

Stephen Hall

Founder, Brandworks Distribution LLC

Stephen S.J. Hall was a 1956 graduate of the school of Hotel Administration at Cornell University. He also holds an MBA with high honors from Michigan State University as well as a Masters Degree in Divinity from Harvard. After serving as a Marine Corps officer from 1956 to 1958 he spent most of his career in the hospitality industry starting as a field engineer with Sheraton Corporation. He was promoted to Director of Operations Support for ITT Sheraton leaving in 1971 to become Vice President for Administration of Harvard where he managed 10 departments with an annual budget of $95 million dollars spending an additional 300 million per annum for new construction. While at ITT Sheraton one of his duties was as the first Quality Assurance Director in the industry. In 1981 he formed a quality assurance consulting company and implemented the first quality assurance program in the American Hotel and Lodging Association. The company also put in programs in the Bahamas as well as several hotels in the US including the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, WV. Mr. Hall has taught Quality Assurance at several universities including Cornell, the University of Nevada Las Vegas, New Hampshire, the Instut de Management Hoteiier in Cergy- Pontoise, France as well as Glion in Switzerland where he was also the Director of Studies. He has given seminars worldwide. He has also held positions as Pastor of the Congregational church in Cohasset Massachusetts and the Associate Pastor of the American Church in Paris, France. Mr. Hall has written and published four books: QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY - The American Society for Quality Control, READINGS IN ETHICS - Education Institute of AH&LA, JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE - Dog Ear Press and PLUMB BOB - Dog Ear Press. While quality assurance is traditionally defined as conformance to standards will Mr. Hall has promoted the idea that conformance to standards alone is insufficient. Standards must be “right” standards thus introducing ethics and replaces quality assurance with the word excellence as the ultimate goal. Excellence is defined as “consistently doing right things.” Although several surveys, in recent years, indicated that managers have a strong interest in ethics and consider the practice of ethics to be beneficial to the bottom line, few hotels have a comprehensive program of ethics in place. The problem is analyzed in the book PLUMB BOB which also includes a new theory of which can be easily taught to employees

Mr. Hall can be contacted at Larry_Hall@SpringerMiller.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.