Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Llorens

Dave Llorens

CEO, EverWatt Lights

Dave Llorens is an electrical engineer and the CEO of EverWatt Lights, a lighting-as-a-service company that helps commercial properties save money by replacing their lighting with EverWatt LED lights for no upfront cost. EverWatt eliminates the vertical marketing structure with its many levels of distributors, supply stores, and regional and local reps by manufacturing and installing the LED lights. This results in cost savings to the end user by cutting out the middleman (and the markups).

Before EverWatt, Mr. Llorens started several businesses, including One Block Off the Grid, which helps put big-ticket, environmentally friendly home improvements within reach of the average homeowner. Homeowners can save money with solar technology, even learning how much they can save with just a quick phone call using One Block Off the Grid's custom technology. The company also helps homeowners negotiate discounts, vet installers, and design and buy/lease solar systems over the phone.

Mr. Llorens founded the company in 2008, and in 2012 he transitioned to COO after One Block Off the Grid merged with Pure Energies. In 2014, the company was acquired by NRG for $120 million.

Mr. Llorens has been passionate about entrepreneurship since he opened his first lemonade stand in Shreveport, Louisiana. He's an avid poker player who in 2004 started an online gambling software business, which he grew to a $2 million run rate before it was killed by the Internet Gambling Act of 2006. He also served as co-founder and CEO of 60-Day MBA, a program designed to help aspiring entrepreneurs start businesses. While 60-Day MBA ultimately failed as a business, the program provided numerous aspiring entrepreneurs with the tools they needed to succeed.

Please visit http://everwattlights.com/ for more information.

Mr. Llorens can be contacted at +1 510-730-0062 or dave@everwattlights.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.