Extended Stay America Opens Newest Location in Savannah, Georgia

USA, Charlotte, North Carolina. July 21, 2020

Extended Stay America, Inc. (NASDAQ:STAY), the largest mid-priced extended-stay hotel brand, announced the opening of the Extended Stay America - Savannah - Pooler hotel in Pooler, Georgia.

The four-story 124-room property features complimentary Wi-Fi, premium cable, a STAYFIT fitness room, STAYCLEAN laundry room, and our signature spacious STAYPLAY lobby with additional vending options. The rooms include fully equipped kitchens with full-size refrigerators, stovetop, cookware, utensils, and dishes as well as pillowtop beds, recliners, spacious workspace, and television streaming capabilities.

"The hotel represents the fifth corporately owned, new construction property we have opened utilizing our updated ESA prototype. The addition of this property allows us to continue to place hotels where our core, extended-stay guests need us to be, in growing communities," said Judi Bikulege, Chief Investment Officer, Extended Stay America.

The property is located at 500 Outlets Parkway South in Pooler, GA, a community west of Savannah in the Tanger Outlets, which features 95 name brand stores, six restaurants. It is less than five miles from Gulfstream, JCB Americas, Oglethorpe Speedway, and the Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport and has easy access to the Memorial Health University Medical Center, St. Joseph's/Candler Health Systems, along with the famous Mighty Eighty Air Force Museum.

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