Editorial Board   

Mr. Dauner

Bob Dauner

Vice President, Sales & Business Development, BeDynamic, Inc

Bob Dauner is a highly skilled and broadly experienced sales and marketing strategist, team leader and relationship sales tactician with over 30 years experience in the hospitality, travel and enterprise software industries. Mr. Dauner specializes in strategic sales system/organization design, resource deployment modeling and compensation, recognition, reward systems design and implementation. He assists companies in designing, building-out, assessing, and or/realigning their sales organizations to improve results from field sales, channel sales, regional/national sales, and telemarketing/telesales. With a sharp focus upon target account solution selling and measurable accountabilities, Mr. Dauner builds high performing sales organizations and mentors senior sales executives to maximize top-line revenues and drive profitability. Mr. Dauner began his career as a professional educator, but left the profession to pursue his passion for travel. He embarked on his 20 year career in hotel industry sales and marketing with a position with Hyatt in Hawaii. Mr. Dauner's hospitality industry career has spanned a broad range of progressively responsible sales and marketing leadership positions from on-property assignments to regional, national and global responsibilities with Hyatt and Westin/Starwood Hotels & Resorts. In addition, he has served in a destination sales and marketing executive leadership role with the San Jose (California) Convention & Visitors Bureau. Leveraging his hospitality industry insights and experience integrating people, process and technology to maximize organizational results, Mr. Dauner also provided thought leadership, practice direction and key account sales management in the Customer Relationship Management consulting practice of a $700mm strategic applications consultancy, Cambridge Technology Partners. As an independent consultant, Bob has also provided sales and marketing expertise to early stage companies in the fields of travel services, content management and integrated real estate facility management software solutions. Mr. Dauner graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature and a Master of Arts in Teaching (secondary education) degree from Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. He has received training certification in numerous hospitality and consulting industry sales and marketing program curricula and earned his professional "stripes" in the field.

Mr. Dauner can be contacted at 408-358-8603 or bobd@bedynamic.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.