Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bush

Christopher Bush

Executive Vice President, Canyon Equity LLC

Christopher Bush has acquired broad operational and re-positioning experience in the luxury hospitality segment. A native of the UK, Mr. Bush's multi-faceted career has taken him to five countries across three continents.

As Executive Vice President of Canyon Equity LLC, Mr. Bush is one of the executives who in 2005 formed the original core of this resort development and acquisition firm based near San Francisco.

Mr. Bush heads up asset management for the company's six operating resorts. Canyon's properties include three Aman resorts, namely Le Melezin in the French Alps, Amangiri in Utah, and Amangani at Jackson Hole, also the Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado in Santa Fe, and the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in Fiji.

Canyon Equity developed the ultra-luxury Amangiri resort (Utah) from the ground up, opening in October 2009. The resort was an immediate success and has been the recipient of innumerable awards and accolades in the short time since its opening.

Mr. Bush also directs Canyon's hotel management subsidiary, Canyon Hotel & Resorts, which currently manages the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in the Fiji Islands. This entity is set up to take additional resorts under its management as the company expands. Mr. Bush has managed some very notable hotels and resorts including Jumby Bay in Antigua, The Stanford Court in San Francisco, Palmilla Resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, and Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina.

Earlier assignments include Regional Director of Marketing for Princes Hotels, based in Los Angeles and Director of Marketing for the 850-room Maria-Isabel Hotel in Mexico City

Please visit http://www.canyonequity.com for more information.

Mr. Bush can be contacted at 415-925-8000 or cbush@canyonequity.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.