Editorial Board   

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Assoc. Professor, Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, FIU

Dr. Miranda Kitterlin is an Associate Professor in the Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Florida International University, where she teaches graduate level Hospitality Management courses. She received her doctoral degree in May of 2010 in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Dr. Kitterlin holds a Master's degree in Human Resources and a Bachelor's degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette.

Prior to beginning a career in academia, Dr. Kitterlin worked for 11 years in the lodging and food & beverage industries in Louisiana, Michigan, and Las Vegas. What began on a whim as an entry-level front-of-house position quickly developed into operational management, sales, and human resources management roles, and a lifelong passion for Hospitality Management.

During her industry career, Dr. Kitterlin encountered a number of employee issues that led her to seek answers in academic research. Each scholarly investigative venture fueled the desire to begin another, resulting in her decision to pursue a terminal degree and a future in academia. Her first educational venture was as an instructor as St. Landry Accelerated Transition School, where she designed a Hospitality and Tourism curriculum and skills certification program for the vocational educational program.

During her university level academic career, Dr. Kitterlin has taught both traditional and online Hospitality Management classes at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, James Madison University, and now Florida International University, where she teaches Master's degree classes in Hospitality Industry Organizational Behavior, and Case Studies in Hospitality Management.

Dr. Kitterlin's research focuses primarily on Food and Beverage, Human Resources, and Organizational Behavior issues. She has published on topics of foodservice industry employee selection and screening, employee behavior and perceptions, training needs of hospitality employees, food-safety education, and hospitality student learning styles. Much of her work centers on employee substance abuse and employment drug-testing in the hospitality industry.

Please visit http://www.fiu.edu for more information.

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D. can be contacted at 305-919-4424 or miranda.kitterlin@fiu.edu

Coming up in October 2020...

Revenue Management: Maximizing Profit

Hotel Revenue Management continues to evolve at a blistering pace. Driven by technological innovation and new distribution channels, there are some dynamic opportunities for expansion in this fast-growing field. The technology is primarily designed to help revenue managers further refine their operations and pricing models to maximize hotel profit. For example, hotels can't be all things to all people, so a key strategy is to precisely identify their target audience. By employing geo-targeting techniques and analyzing behavior such as previous bookings, on-property purchases and online shopping practices, there is an increased capability to define guest demographics. By segmenting customers in more specific ways, hotels are able to create more personalized experiences which, in turn, allow managers to optimize their room rates. It is also an effective way to fulfill the unique needs and preferences of the individual. Another methodology is to consistently monitor the competition's pricing strategies. There are software tools that analyze a competitor's current rates, and then allow a hotel to make its own pricing adjustments. It is also a useful means to conduct forecasting models. Other technologies that are being integrated into a revenue manager's toolkit include Artificial Intelligence in the form of automated algorithms, and Voice Recognition (VR) for data inquiries, rate changes, and booking behavior. Predictive and analytic software programs are also being leveraged to provide more forward-looking data, instead of the usual reliance on historical performance. These metrics allow managers to be more proactive - rather than reactive - with their revenue strategy. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine these developments and report on how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.