Editorial Board   

Ms. Creighton

Myra Creighton

Partner, Fisher & Phillips LLP

Myra Creighton is a partner in Fisher & Phillips LLP's Atlanta office. Her practice in labor and employment law primarily focuses on advising clients concerning their obligations to employees under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act, ensuring their policies and procedures are consistent with both these laws and defending clients against employee claims alleging violations of the ADA and FMLA. She also counsels and defends clients concerning Title VII, ADEA, and GINA issues that arise in the workplace. Ms. Creighton routinely presents seminars, webinars, and training programs on ADA and FMLA topics such as Substance Abuse under the ADA, Managing the Medical Certification Process under the FMLA, Controlling Intermittent Leave under the FMLA, Reasonable Accommodation and the Interactive Process Under the ADA, and Medical Examinations and Inquiries under the ADA. Ms. Creighton authored the chapter entitled "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act" in the treatise, Mental and Emotional Injuries in Employment Litigation, Second Edition, published by the Bureau of National Affairs in 2001, and the 2006 and 2008 Supplements to the chapter. Ms. Creighton co-authored "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Employee Assistance Programs As Sources of Liability," 24 Employee Relations Law Journal 79 (1998); and "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act: A Management Rights Approach," 20 Employee Relations Law Journal 541 (1995), as well as multiple other articles on ADA topics. Prior to joining Fisher & Phillips LLP in 1993, Ms. Creighton was a law clerk for Judge Duross Fitzpatrick of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia

Ms. Creighton can be contacted at 404-240-4285 or mcreighton@laborlawyers.com

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.