Editorial Board   

Ms. Creighton

Myra Creighton

Partner, Fisher & Phillips LLP

Myra Creighton is a partner in Fisher & Phillips LLP's Atlanta office. Her practice in labor and employment law primarily focuses on advising clients concerning their obligations to employees under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act, ensuring their policies and procedures are consistent with both these laws and defending clients against employee claims alleging violations of the ADA and FMLA. She also counsels and defends clients concerning Title VII, ADEA, and GINA issues that arise in the workplace. Ms. Creighton routinely presents seminars, webinars, and training programs on ADA and FMLA topics such as Substance Abuse under the ADA, Managing the Medical Certification Process under the FMLA, Controlling Intermittent Leave under the FMLA, Reasonable Accommodation and the Interactive Process Under the ADA, and Medical Examinations and Inquiries under the ADA. Ms. Creighton authored the chapter entitled "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act" in the treatise, Mental and Emotional Injuries in Employment Litigation, Second Edition, published by the Bureau of National Affairs in 2001, and the 2006 and 2008 Supplements to the chapter. Ms. Creighton co-authored "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Employee Assistance Programs As Sources of Liability," 24 Employee Relations Law Journal 79 (1998); and "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act: A Management Rights Approach," 20 Employee Relations Law Journal 541 (1995), as well as multiple other articles on ADA topics. Prior to joining Fisher & Phillips LLP in 1993, Ms. Creighton was a law clerk for Judge Duross Fitzpatrick of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia

Ms. Creighton can be contacted at 404-240-4285 or mcreighton@laborlawyers.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.