Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bergkvist

Jan Peter Bergkvist

Owner, SleepwellAB

Jan Peter "JP" Bergkvist has been active in the field of Sustainable Business at an executive level in the hospitality in industry since the early nineties. 15 years with Scandic with the last 9 years in an executive management position including 4 years with Hilton International in the role of Director of Environmental Sustainability.

In January 2009 Mr. Bergkvist stepped back from his position as Vice President Sustainable Business at Scandic to a role of senior advisor working in his own business SleepWell AB. In 2010 he published the book Sustainability in Practice - a fast guide for business leaders.

Since 2010 SleepWell is running the secretariat of Sweden Textile Water Initiative, stwi.se one of the largest public-private partnerships in Sweden. STWI is founded by the leading actors in the Swedish textile industry and supported by the government. The mission is to create guide lines for and promote sustainable water use for textile production in developing countries.

Mr Bergkvist is a director of the board of Ecolabelling Sweden (the Nordic Swan) and SIWI, Stockholm International Water Institute. He also serves as chairman of the Stockholm Water Prize Founders Council and Swedish Artists for the Environment. He is a member of the advisory panel of International Tourism Partnership in London, ITP.

Mr Bergkvist has recently started a new sustainability project in southern France. In a recently acquired medieval house he has begun a total restoration with only sustainable techniques and materials. Once the house is fully restored it will serve as a test laboratory for a sustainable B&B with the ambition to combine the latest sustainability practices from different corners of the world. The soft opening will commence during 2017.

Mr. Bergkvist can be contacted at 46766336868 or janpeter.bergkvist@sleepwell.nu

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.