Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Mullen

Sean Mullen

Chief Sales & Marketing Officer , Noble House Hotels & Resorts

Sean Mullen, chief sales and marketing officer at Noble House Hotels & Resorts, offers a results-driven approach to marketing through 20 years of hospitality industry experience, ranging from sales and catering to marketing and management. His success in branding, positioning, consumer marketing, revenue growth and advertising effectiveness contribute to the growth and development of business and support corporate strategic initiatives. Appointed to the newly-created title of chief sales and marketing officer at Noble House in September 2011, Mr. Mullen oversees a nationwide sales team of more than 45 employees, working to provide targeted, strategic sales support and direction in all market segments. He also oversees strategic direction and implementation in sales, marketing, catering, conference services, reservations sales and national sales. Previously, Mr. Mullen acted as the Noble House Hotels & Resorts corporate director of sales and marketing from 2003 - 2007. Mr. Mullen began his career with Noble House in 2002 at LaPlaya Beach & Golf Resort in Naples, Fla., as the director of sales and marketing. In this role he developed strong marketing campaigns, repositioned the brand and completed a $54 million transformation. As a seasoned hotel industry executive, with experience in commercial luxury properties and international real estate, Mr. Mullen has incredible expertise in management takeovers, ownership changes, repositioning under performing assets, and expansion and development for high-profile companies such as Ritz-Carlton Hotels, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, Jack Nicklaus Golf Companies, Fairmont Hotels, Auberge Hotels and Capella Hotels. In addition, he is knowledgable in the opening of real estate developments, from hotels and resorts to clubs and golf courses. Mr. Mullen attended Lafayette College in Eason, Penn., and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in economics/business with a minor in anthropology and sociology. He grew up in New Jersey and currently resides in Seattle, Wash., with his wife and four daughters. Mullen has won multiple industry and corporate awards including: • The Departures Magazine Luxury Marketing Achievement Award 2005 • HSMAI Adrian Awards - Gold, Silver and Bronze 2005 • Nominated as International Hotel and Restaurant Association and HOTELS “Young Hotelier & Restaurateur of the World Award” 1999

Mr. Mullen can be contacted at 425-827-8737 or smullen@noblehousehotels.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.