Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Talwar

Rohit Talwar

CEO, Fast Future Research

Rohit Talwar is a global futurist, strategic advisor and the CEO of Fast Future Research and Fast Future Publishing. He advises business, government and NGO leaders around the world on how to prepare for and create the future in an increasingly disrupted world.

Mr. Talwar has a particular interest in the future of travel, tourism, aviation and the meetings industry.  He is a regular speaker and advisor around the world on the future of tourism and aviation strategies and business models. He focuses on the exploration of the impact of economic, consumer, technological, environmental and commercial forces.

Mr. Talwar is the author of the Hotels 2020 study and project director of the Convention 2020 research program. His clients include 3M, Aeroports de Paris, Aerovista, Amadeus, Astra Zeneca, E&Y, GE, GSK, IBM, Intel, Intercontinental Hotels, ITB, KPMG, Nokia, Novartis, O2, Orange, Panasonic, PATA, Pfizer, PwC, Preferred Hotels, Qatar Airways, SABRE, SAP, Schiphol Airport, Siemens Airport Services, Travelport, Vancouver Airport Services, World Tourism Forum and the OECD.

Mr. Talwar also works with a range of city and national level government agencies, convention centers and tourism and convention bureaus around the world.

Fast Future is a global foresight research and consulting firm that helps clients understand, anticipate and respond to the trends, forces and ideas that could shape the competitive landscape over the next 5-20 years.

Fast Future's work draws on a range of proven foresight, strategy and creative processes to help clients develop deep insights into a changing world. These insights are used to help clients define innovative strategies and practical actions to implement them.

Please visit http://www.fastfuture.com for more information.

Mr. Talwar can be contacted at +44 02088300766 or rohit@fastfuture.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.