Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. McGuire

Kelly McGuire

Vice President, Advanced Analytics, Wyndham Destination Network

Dr. Kelly McGuire is Vice President, Advanced Analytics at Wyndham Destination Networks where she leads a team of scientists and developers that build custom analytical solutions for Wyndham's vacation rental business, as well as RCI's exchange market.

Dr. McGuire is an analytics evangelist, helping hospitality and gaming businesses realize the value from big data and advanced analytics initiatives, to build a culture of fact based decision making. Her first book, "Hotel Pricing in a Social World", was recently published by Wiley books. Prior to joining Wyndham, Dr. McGuire lead SAS's Services Industry Global Practice, a team of domain experts in hospitality, gaming, travel, transportation, communications, media, entertainment and the mid-market. Internally at SAS, she was responsible for setting the strategic direction for the practice and defining the industry portfolio and messaging for her industries.

Before taking on this role, she was the industry marketing manager for Hospitality and Gaming at SAS, responsible for the outbound messaging regarding SAS's Hospitality and Gaming capabilities. She also worked with the joint IDeaS and SAS product management team, gathering requirements for ancillary revenue management solutions such as function space, spa and food and beverage. Dr. McGuire was also responsible for defining requirements and creating the market strategy for SAS Revenue Management and Price Optimization Analytics, which is the analytics engine for IDeaS G3 RMS.

Dr. McGuire has a BS from Georgetown University and a MMH and PhD in Revenue Management from the Cornell School of Hotel Administration, where she studied with renowned revenue management researcher, Dr. Sherri Kimes. Her research has been published in the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Journal of Pricing and Revenue Management, Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research and the Journal of Service Management. She is also a frequent contributor to industry publications, speaker at industry conferences and was co-author of the SAS/CHR blog "The Analytic Hospitality Executive". Her latest stream of research, with co-author Breffni Noone, Associate Professor, Penn State, deals with the influence of user generated content on consumer reaction to price during hotel room purchases.

Dr. McGuire can be contacted at 973-753-6411 or Kelly.McGuire@rci.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.