Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bowen

John T. Bowen

Dean & Barron Hilton Distinguished Chair at the Conrad N. Hilton College, University of Houston

John Bowen is Dean of the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He has presented marketing courses and seminars in Asia, Australia, Central America, Europe, Mexico and South America, and has published over 100 articles on marketing. He is also the North American Research Director for World Wide Hospitality Trends. Dr. Bowen is a coauthor of Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, the leading hospitality marketing textbook in the world. Currently, it is published in nine languages. He is also the coauthor of Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. A recipient of numerous awards for both his teaching and research, Dr. Bowen is a three-time recipient of CHRIE's Wiley Research Award, formerly the Van Nostrand Reinhold Research Award, which recognizes lifetime research achievements in the hospitality field. His research focus is on customer service, customer loyalty and electronic distributing systems for service industries. Dean Bowen's industry experience is in the area of food and beverage. He has worked in hotels, freestanding restaurants and as the corporate food and beverage manager of a hotel management company. For 15 years, he owned and operated Theodore Zinck's in downtown Dallas. A dedicated educator, Dr. Bowen started his teaching career in 1978 at Del Mar College's Restaurant Management Program. He was an assistant professor at the Hilton College from 1980 to 1990. In 1990, he left to teach at Bond University in Australia and returned to the United States in 1993 to take a position at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He returned to the Hilton College as Dean in 2003. Expertise & Research Interests • Customer Satisfaction • Customer Loyalty • New Product Development • Casino Player Behavior Selected Publications - Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006). Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Prentice Hall. Published in eight languages. - Shock, P. Bowen, J. & Stefanelli, J. (2004). Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Published in three languages. - Mayer, K. Bowen, J. & Moulton, M. (2003). A Proposed Model of Service Descriptors, The Journal of Services Marketing, 17(6), 621-639. - Sparks, B., Bowen, J. & Klag, S. (2003). Restaurants and the Tourist Market. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 15(1), 6-13. - Bowen, J. & Ford, R. (2002). Does Having a Thing Make a Difference? Journal of Management, 28(3), 447-469. - Lucas, A. & Bowen, J. (2002). An Analysis of Slot Promotions. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 21(2), 189-202. Received the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Su, W. & Bowen, J. (2001). Restaurant Customer Complaint Behavior. Journal of Restaurant and Foodservice Marketing, 4(2), 35-65. - Bowen, J. & Shaing-Lih C. (2001). The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty and Customer Satisfaction. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 13(5), 13-17. Awarded Best Article for 2001. - Nelson, K. & Bowen, J. (2000). Employee uniforms: Their impact on customer and employee satisfaction. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 41(2), 86-95. - Bowen, J., & Shoemaker, S. (2003). Loyalty: A Strategic Commitment. Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 44(5/6), 31-46. Awarded the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Makens, J. & Bowen, J. (1996). Increasing Profits Through Product Merchandising. The Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 37(1), 72-79.

Mr. Bowen can be contacted at 713-743-0209 or jtbowen@Central.UH.EDU

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.