Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Frank

Tema Frank

CEO, Frank Reactions

Tema Frank, Chief Instigator at customer experience consultancy Frank Reactions, has been pioneering online success for hotels and other businesses since 2001. She has over 30 years' experience in marketing, customer service, user experience testing and business strategy.

Ms. Franks clients have ranged from small B&Bs in France to large organizations like Expedia, Travel Alberta, Sabre Holdings, Cruise Ship Centres and the Alberta Motor Association. Using social media techniques before social media existed, Ms. Frank built an international panel of 75,000 mystery shoppers using no paid advertising. Her company's ground-breaking approach of having large numbers of prospective customers do usability testing of websites from their own computers changed the way websites are evaluated and gives clients great insight into how to increase web sales conversions.

Ms. Frank hosts the weekly Internet radio show (podcast), Frank Reactions on Customer Experience, which discusses how companies can meet (and exceed) the ever-increasing customer service expectations in our social media era. The podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher and at her website.

Ms. Frank speaks at conferences internationally, and has taught Digital Marketing at the University of Alberta, at the Universite de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour in France, Grant MacEwan University, and in short courses for companies and government departments.

Ms. Frank's recently released second book, PeopleShock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule, is an Amazon bestseller. Based on interviews with over 150 business leaders, the book argues that as more becomes automated, what's left for human interaction becomes even more important. Using case studies she shows how profitable customer experiences, come from improving relationships and processes for all the people involved, from suppliers to your front line to customers and beyond.

Please visit http://www.FrankReactions.com for more information.

Ms. Frank can be contacted at 866-544-9262 or tema@frankreactions.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.