Editorial Board   

Mr. Redington

Neale Redington

Partner, Deloitte

Redington has been an advisor to major real estate firms for more than 17 years in the REIT and hospitality sectors. He brings opportunities for wealth creation to hotel owner/operators and management companies through performance of annual audits, operations reviews, due diligence procedures, and assistance with initial public offerings. Last year, Redington provided accounting advisory assistance to KSL Recreation with its $2.2 billion sale of luxury resorts, including Grand Wailea and La Quinta Resort, to CNL Hospitality. This was the largest US luxury hospitality transaction during 2004 and was recently awarded "Transaction of the Year" at the Americas Lodging Investment Summit. Redington has been instrumental in many REIT formation transactions, dating back to the early 90s with G&L Realty and Alexander Haagen Properties. More recently, he has worked with Casden Properties, CNL Hotels and Resorts, and CB Richard Ellis. During his career, he has provided due diligence assistance in many major real estate transactions, including Southern California deals such as Cendant's acquisition of Coldwell Banker and Century 21 and national transactions such as Blackstone's acquisition of Homestead Group and KKR's disposition of Red Lion Hotels. Redington is co-author of the Hospitality chapter of the Real Estate Accounting Handbook, and has participated in the development of the 10th Edition of the Uniform System of Accounts for the Lodging Industry. He frequently speaks on hospitality issues at trade events and with the media. Redington attended Birmingham University where he received his BCom(Acc)(Hons). He is active in the Manhattan Beach community where he lives with his wife Marissa and three children.

Mr. Redington can be contacted at 213-688-4762 or nredington@deloitte.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.