Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Kreyling

Anna Kreyling

Interior Designer, Baskervill Hospitality Studio

As an interior designer in Baskervill's award-winning hospitality studio, Anna Kreyling, NCIDQ, has led ground up, prototype, and substantial renovation projects for select service, full service, and boutique brands—including numerous jobs for Marriott International, Hilton, IHG, and Hyatt—to name a few. Previously in-house at an esteemed ownership group, Ms. Kreyling leverages her diverse experience to translate brand ethos into physical spaces that both delight guests and contribute to hoteliers' bottom line.

Her early background in studio art and photography gives her an eye for framing dynamic experiential designs where balance is her most important success metric. From understanding the psychology of how guests use intimate spaces such as guestrooms, to dissecting the best ways to foster larger gatherings in public spaces—people and purpose are at the heart of Ms. Kreyling's design philosophy.

Form and function are equals in Ms. Kreyling's eye: beauty must be durable, and spaces should be intuitive so guests can navigate with confidence, all without losing the unexpected touches that make people want to explore and discover. Eager to build on vision and hungry to leverage untapped potential, Ms. Kreyling tends to listen more than talk, examining what makes the most sense holistically for a specific ownership group, brand, guest, and envisioned site for the property. To her, design is a team sport that's best played when perspectives and personalities collide under a unified desire to give guests genuine "wow" moments.


Please visit http://www.baskervill.com for more information.

Ms. Kreyling can be contacted at +1 804-343-1010 or akreyling@baskervill.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.