Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Brown

Randy Brown

President and Founder, Soundproof Windows

Randy Brown is the owner and president of Soundproof Windows, Inc.  headquartered in Reno, Nevada. 

Mr. Brown graduated from the University of Texas Business School in 1983.   He has a diverse background in sales, manufacturing, construction, computer programming and engineering.   He started a wholesale ice manufacturing business that he sold after 12 years.  During these twelve years he designed and constructed a new ice manufacturing facility in Corpus Christi using several innovative and successful designs.  He modified the ice manufacturing equipment and increased production 32%.  These improved designs were then used by the equipment manufacturer.  Mr. Brown's Father was in the storm window business during the 60's and 70's (before the advent of dual pane windows) where Mr. Brown learned about high quality storm windows and how they helped reduce noise levels.

Mr. Brown initially developed the first version of a Soundproof Window to solve his own noise problems at his residence.  He applied his knowledge about storm windows and designed acoustic improvements to solve his noise problems.  Friends convinced him to solve their noise problems and Soundproof Windows was born.  Later, his musician friends convinced him to develop high quality recording studio products.  His continual lab testing and innovative design changes has greatly improved his windows and doors over the years. 

Mr. Brown holds world records for the amount of noise stopped for residential windows, recording studio windows, sliding glass doors and steel doors.  He has a couple of patents pending for his designs. Soundproof Windows, Inc. is now in its 20th year and is the National leader for acoustic windows and doors.

Please visit https://www.soundproofwindows.com for more information.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at info@soundproofwindows.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.