Editorial Board   

Mr. Hancock

Paul Hancock

Executive Chef, Miramonte Resort and Spa

Chef Paul Hancock took an interest in the kitchen at an early age. "I remember walking to the other side of the island and running home all wide-eyed, 'Mom, they fry their fish in peanut oil over there!'" He explains, "I just had that fascination with how other people did things, how they lived their lives and cooked their food."

And so began a path of culinary discovery, rich with fine dining experiences at exclusive supper clubs in North Carolina, and some of the South's legendary restaurants.

Ever eager for new challenges, Chef Hancock traveled to the French Alps to accomplish his chef's apprenticeship at L'auberge de L'Eridian under the tutelage of Chef Marc Veyrat—at the time a 3-star Michelin chef renowned for his foraging and use of wild herbs and ingredients. Chef Hancock quickly grasped the concept of great recipes and the meticulous steps that go into implementing them.

Not one to rest on his laurels, Chef Hancock's craftsmanship, resourcefulness, and wanderlust turned out to be a perfect match for super mega yachts; he spent 3 ½ years executing elaborate dinner parties while traveling the world with elite guests and international celebrities. Back in the States, Chef Hancock was instrumental in opening five-star fine dining and banquet experiences in Hollywood, Florida, including the now Diplomat Resort and Spa, receiving the four star four diamond award from AAA.

Here in California, Chef Paul has been called on by a long list of celebrity clients. Chef Hancock now calls Indian Wells home, delighted to share his farm-to-table values and focus on building new relationships in the small community of Indian Wells.

Please visit http://miramonteresort.com for more information.

Mr. Hancock can be contacted at 760-837-1631 or phancock@miramonteresort.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.