Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bashaw

Curtis Bashaw

Co-Managing Partner, Cape Advisors and Cape Resorts Group

Curtis Bashaw is the co-founder and co-managing partner of Cape Advisors, a high-profile real estate development firm operating out of New York and New Jersey, as well as Cape Resorts Group, a division of Cape Advisors and hotel operating group focusing on classic American resort properties. Mr. Bashaw is widely known for his expertise in creatively repositioning underutilized and abandoned properties. His credentials include the restoration of the landmark 1816 Congress Hall hotel and award-winning Virginia Hotel and Cottages in Cape May, N.J. Other properties include The Star Inn, Sandpiper Beach Club, and Beach Shack/Rusty Nail Bar and Restaurant in Cape May, and The Chelsea in Atlantic City. His organization expanded to the Hamptons in 2015, opening two new properties in Sag Harbor: Baron's Cove and the Bulova Watchcase Factory. Since entering the real estate/hospitality industry in 1982, Bashaw has preserved and developed dozens of hotel, restaurant, residential, retail, office and mixed-use properties. His emphasis remains on adaptive reuse, historic preservation and economic development. The developer/hotelier took time off in 2004-2005 to serve as New Jersey's executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, a job that entailed overseeing the investment of more than $250 million of gaming tax revenues in economic development projects statewide. Currently, Mr. Bashaw serves on the Board of Trustees at the New York Academy of Art and is the founder and president of The Fund for Cape May. He is also a member of the board of Cape May Stage and is a member of the Cape May City Mayor's Advisory Committee and N.J. First Legislative District Economic Development Task Force. Previously, he served on the Board of Trustees for Stockton College, including a term as president of the board; and sat on the Cape May County Planning Board, New Jersey Governor's Tourism Advisory Council, and New Jersey Cultural Trust. His work in the public and private sector has earned him many accolades, including commendations from the Cape May Jazz Festival, Cape May County Planning Board, N.J. State Assembly, N.J. State Senate and U.S. House of Representatives; as well as numerous honors from community organizations.

Please visit http://www.caperesorts.com for more information.

Mr. Bashaw can be contacted at 609-884-9300 or cbashaw@capeadvisors.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.