Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Muller

David Muller

Founder, DCM Fabrication

David Muller is a visual translator, a professional fluent in the language of design, which enables him to transform an artist's sketches and renderings into a display of Christmastime enchantment, Swiss perfection and a stage on behalf of a grand production celebrating, respectively, fashion as a lifestyle and museums as gateways to the wonders of the universe. As the Founder of DCM Fabrication, Mr. Muller uses light, technology and various accessories to convert a window or an exhibition into a scene of collegiate bonhomie - of mannequins outfitted by Ralph Lauren, standing in a room adorned with vintage pennants, classic books, steamer trunks, suitcases and other pieces of luggage - in which the brass buttons of a navy blazer sparkle like gold coins and a striped silk tie is a makeshift belt for a pair of flat-front khakis. Creating that dream world, under navy blue awnings stamped with Lauren's iconic polo player, or segueing from this theme to the minimalism of Calvin Klein's aesthetic, or celebrating the ultra-luxury of a Patek Philippe timepiece, that “You never really own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation,” all of this - the materials, the staging, the infusion of beauty and elegance - is what Mr. Muller does. From his work with the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth at the American Museum of Natural History to his projects for J. Crew and The Frye Company, Mr. Muller makes a two-dimensional drawing a three-dimensional piece of commercial art. A graduate of Morrisville State College, he resides in New York City.

Mr. Muller can be contacted at muller543@aol.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.