Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Lee

Kenny Lee

Vice President of Marketing, Revinate

Kenny Lee is the VP of Marketing at Revinate, a San Francisco-based software company. Revinate helps hotels know more about their guests so they can deliver personalized experiences that create valuable relationships and lifelong customers. Using guest data combined with Revinate's marketing engagement platform, hotels can better understand and engage their audiences, increasing loyalty and revenue. Over 25,000 of the world's leading hotels trust Revinate to help them reinvent the guest experience. Mr. Lee has 20 years of experience working across multiple marketing disciplines in both startups and enterprise organizations. At Lithium Technologies, a leading SaaS based social customer experience platform provider, he led the global transformation of the company's marketing funnel and delivered a world class marketing automation program. This helped the company quantify their marketing ROI and make more informed decisions based on quantitative metrics. Mr. Lee's passion for customer success is based on his long and successful tenure at Adobe Systems, the global leader in digital marketing and digital media solutions. At Adobe he held numerous leadership roles in NA, EMEA and Latin America marketing, digital campaign and product marketing functions. This enabled him to build deep customer and partner relationships while affording him the opportunity to work with many business types, from small, independent operators to Fortune 100 brands. His efforts resulted in several employee achievement awards including nomination for a coveted company Founders award. While his work experience has provided years of business travel opportunities, Mr. Lee's other passion lies in adventure, sports and volunteer travel. In 2001 he spent 3 weeks volunteering in Ghana where he helped build a school and community facility. His adventure travels include hiking the Inca trail to Machu Picchu, paddling the Amazon river, criss-crossing Mongolia by jeep, surfing remote parts of Canada and Mexico, and exploring India by planes, trains and automobiles. One of his most memorable experiences was trekking to Everest base camp in 2011. A Canadian living in the San Francisco bay area for the past 15 years, Mr. Lee spends his time enjoying California weather and planning his next big vacation. He graduated from the University of Waterloo with a bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional Planning.

Please visit www.revinate.com for more information.

Mr. Lee can be contacted at 415-347-8610 or kenny@revinate.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.