Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Mizes

Ben Mizes

CEO, Clever Real Estate

Ben Mizes is the Co-Founder and CEO of Clever Real Estate, the free online service that connects you with a top-rated, full service real estate agent who can help you save thousands on commission. Clever was founded on the idea that home buying and selling is too expensive and fraught with hidden fees. By offering a discount solution that still provides all the services you come to expect from an agent, Mr. Mizes hopes to disrupt a stall industry.

Mr. Mizes' real estate journey to become the CEO of a thriving real estate tech start-up began in St. Louis, Missouri, his hometown. He invested in several multi-family properties right out of college with his business partner and Clever Real Estate's CSO, Luke Babich. Mr. Mizes became obsessed with real estate investing, and he's now an active real estate investor with 22 units in St. Louis, and a licensed Real Estate Agent in the State of Missouri.

Mr. Mizes realized the real estate industry was ripe for disruption when he saw the ridiculously high fees associated with Realtor commissions. These commissions are typically five to six percent of the home's value - which can seriously cut into profits. Of course, home sellers still need the expertise and knowledge that real estate agents provide. Mr. Mizes founded Clever Real Estate to solve this problem by offering discount solutions with the same quality of service.

Mr. Mizes is a graduate of Indiana University - Bloomington business school, and he's passionate about real estate, investing, and start-up. You can connect with Ben on LinkedIn and follow his real estate investing blog here.

Please visit https://www.listwithclever.com for more information.

Mr. Mizes can be contacted at +1 925-964-3909 or ben@movewithclever.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.