Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Hutchins

Amy Hutchins

Lead Product Manager, BookingSuite (USA), Inc.

Amy Hutchins is a software professional with 12 years of experience designing and building consumer software and online services solutions. She is a Lead Product Manager at BookingSuite, and has spent the past three years focused exclusively on solutions for the hospitality industry. An advocate for non-tech-savvy consumers, Amy emphasizes a premium user experience in all software products. In her current role, Amy has traveled all over the world meeting with hoteliers and learning about their specific pain points and everyday work experiences. By analyzing the nuances of how different hospitality software systems interact with each other, Amy strives to empower properties of all sizes by providing simple end-to-end software solutions to meet their unique needs. She loves the challenge of taking conceptually difficult tasks and distilling them into easy and intuitive solutions to facilitate increased productivity in work and life. Before focusing on hospitality, Amy spent seven years at Microsoft in the Windows division. She spent much of her time in the identity and security space there. She brings that strong background to the hospitality industry, where she works to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for hotel staff and guests alike. Amy graduated from Duke University with a major in Computer Science and minors in Economics and Classical Civilizations. She doesn't get to use the latter quite as much as she had hoped, but it does prove useful when she's traveling to historic destinations.

Please visit http://suite.booking.com/ for more information.

Ms. Hutchins can be contacted at 314-302-9952 or amy.hutchins@booking.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.